BIWGQJY 11I

Jesse VanBuskirk
#4-Brain and MusicIn my music class we were talking about the brain and music and I stumbled upon this stuff on the music wiki. I found these pretty interesting, basically showing both just the edges of the wonders of the mind and the wonders of music.
In class we talked about when you're listening to a certain song you can remember another time when you heard that song and remember almost everything that was going on. We also talked about this person who could only move if she played a certain song in her mind, which you'll see in this video. I'm not sure about the second one, It doesn't really sonvince me that he's actually controlling everything that is going on. Also, if you have the time read this article--> HERE​ ,its fairly decent.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJJPbpHoPWo

#3

Biggest Landfill in the World is not on LandThe Eastern Pacific Garbage Patch

Plastic bags and other waste are polluting the world's oceans.
Plastic bags and other waste are polluting the world's oceans.

How Big Is This Garbage Patch?

Estimated to be twice the size of texas (although it is always changing shape so people are not sure on its size. Approximately 90% of it is plastics and half of it's plasics are heavy and sink to the bottom. The stuff that floats reaches over 10 meters deep. Their is 6 times more items of garbage than plankton.

How Does It Get There?

The garbage comes from all of the surrounding continents of the Eastern Pacific and is taken there by currents causing the garbage to gather into one place.

Eventually all this garbage is thrown back at us as we consume the organisms that live in this environment.

external image great-pacific-garbage-patch.jpg

Sources: //http://www.merosoch.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/pacific-garbage-patch.jpg//


Fire Ants

Ants are known for their ability to lift 100 times their own weight and their numerous ant hills in side walks. They inhabit more regions than humans do. They are found all over the world, except in polar regions.
Probably the most brutal of all ant species are fire ants. They are known for their burning sting which they do by first biting to grip onto the animal and then stinging to release venom into the victim.

Fire ants are now common in Southern United States, Australia, China and South America but United States lacks its natural predators. Scientists are working on controlling fire ant populations by introducing Phorid flies (a parasitoid) which lay eggs in the thorax of ants. The larvae move to the head and release an enzyme that destroys the connecting membrane of the head, then devours its brains and hatches out to reproduce. The fly lives in the ant for about two weeks then lives for a few more weeks.

Fire Ants Video


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References:
http://www.fireant.net/
http://www.aces.edu/dept/extcomm/newspaper/feb22a02.html


Flight of the Bumblebeeexternal image beemovie.jpg
You're probably thinking that I like insects or something by now but I actually don't at all. If I had to choose my favorite insect, I would choose a bee. It's been that way since I saw "The Bee Movie". In the movie they say that a bees body weight is too heavy to make itself fly but in an article from NewScientist magazine it explains how bees defy this conception.

Engineers once proved that bees can't fly because of its weight and short wing beat. Until Dickinson and his colleagues at Caltech filmed bees in flight at 6000 frames per second. They discovered that bees use an unusual pattern of wing beats that creates vortices by rotating its flexible wings, giving the bee lift. The particular bees' wings beated at a speed of 230 times a second in the film.
The work may go towards advancement in aerodynamics in engineering aircraft.
Here's a listing of wing beats per second (according to http://wings.avkids.com/Book/Animals/instructor/insects-02.html):
Honeybee
250 bps
Housefly
190 bps
Bumblebee
130 bps
Syrphis Fly
120 bps
Hornet
100 bps
Horsefly
96 bps
Hummingbird Hawk Moth
85 bps
Aeschnid Dragonfly
38 bps
Scorpion Fly
28 bps
Damselfly
16 bps
Large White Butterfly
12 bps
Links:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khx-VkVSIOQ
http://www.dickinson.caltech.edu/

Source:Helen Phillips-NewScientist magazine Dec 2005